The Testimony of a 30 Year “HeavyHander”

Posted: October 23, 2014 in General
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David Nyman is a 30 Year HeavyHander with a wealth of practical experience in HeavyHands!

He left an excellent comment on the post “Was Dr. Schwartz Against High Intensity Interval Training?”

Just so you don’t miss this information, the comment is being given it’s own “post”:

Great blog! I’m also a long-term Heavyhander (30 years) and mix outdoor HH sessions (3-10 pounds) with running and bodyweight exercise. I also do some indoor work with heavier (22 pound) dumbbells, like goblet squats, bench stepping and snatch/swing moves, usually in intervals. Today’s session was 50 or so minutes of outdoor walking medleys with 7 pounders, much of it using a 30 second work/10 second rest format similar to what Dr S describes above. The “rests” simply involve continuing to walk, but without the arm work. This allowed me to keep my effort level at or around 90% (i.e. of my actual, measured maximum heart rate) for a good chunk of the session, after warm-up.

One thing I’ve notice about HH, as well as the ability to do more total work at any given perceived effort level, as compared with, say, steady running or sprinting, is a quicker return to pre-workout heart rate. Today, for example, although my heart rate was typically around 160 for much of the session, it dropped to around 100 after about a minute of quiet walking, and to 60 within a few minutes of sitting down. Although my recovery is also pretty good after a run, it’s never as quick as after a HH session at an equivalent level of effort. There’s probably something interesting there about sympathetic/parasympathetic balance and the heart-rate variability thing that is gaining popularity now. Over the years I’ve also experienced the Heavyhander’s typical drop in resting heart rate, to about 46-48 during the day, and about 40 by bed-time. This stuff certainly seems good for the old ticker!

Hopefully he’ll share some more about his routines in the future!

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